Friday Funny: U.S. Pet Poll reveals 18% Want a Pet Dinosaur…Really?


I received a newsletter from PSI (Pet Sitters International) this week and one of the headlines stated that a recent U.S. Pet Poll (see here) revealed that 18% really would like to have a dinosaur.   Really?

This is probably what they have in mind:





Have none of them seen Jurassic Park?  Or the sequels?  We’ve all seen them. 

Everyone is all  “Awwww…..” and “Aren’t they cuddly?”  in the beginning.

















And then there’s a lot of screaming and running at the end.








                                                                          
 Another interesting result of the poll was that 26% of those polled wanted a tiger, 20% a giraffe and 16% wanted an elephant. 
















We at Barks and Blooms really love what we do, but I think we’re probably sticking to dogs, cats, birds, bunnies…….maybe the occasional snake………..

Here Comes the Bride….and the dog?

by Sandy Kempton


One of our Fantastically Fabulous Pet Professionals here at Barks and Blooms sent me this picture the other day.



Dogs at weddings is becoming more and more popular.  There are websites dedicated to designing a wedding with humans and canines in mind.    Pinterest is overflowing with boards on the subject.


What do you imagine with you think about a wedding that includes furry friends?  


Or this?




Have you included a fur-kid in your wedding?  Know someone who has?  Tell us about it!


Baby, It’s Hot Outside! (or How to Help Your Dog Avoid Heat Stroke)

By Sandy Kempton


We all know that dogs don’t sweat–except for a teeny bit through their feet.  They depend on panting to exchange hot air for cool, but when the outside air is the same as their inside air, that form of air conditioning isn’t so efficient.  




Being left in a car during hot weather, confined on concrete or asphalt surfaces, and being without shade or fresh water on hot days can lead to heat stroke.  Did you know that Pugs, Pekinese and Bulldogs are more prone to heat stroke because of their cute little noses?


What does heat stroke in dogs look like?  It starts with heavy breathing, the tongue looks bright red, saliva thickens and the dog may vomit.  (The body temperature also rises to over 104 degrees, but most of us don’t have a rectal thermometer handy to check that.)  If shock sets in, the lips turn gray and the dog may become unsteady and collapse.  



So what do you do now?  First, you must cool the dog at once.  Usually moving him to an air-conditioned area is sufficient, but sometimes it is necessary to place the dog in a cool bath or spray him gently with a garden hose for a few minutes.  Be careful not to cool too much or too rapidly,  because that causes another problem:  hypothermia and shock.



Always, always follow up with your veterinarian if you believe your dog has suffered heat stroke to avoid other complications.

Wednesday Adoptables–Feeling Lucky?

By Sandy Kempton

Lucky is a very sweet, friendly and playful sable boy about 5 – 6 years old.  He is great with other dogs and would love a friendly dog to play with.  Lucky likes people and enjoys other pets. He loves rides in the car and walks well on a leash.  He has a beautiful white face markings and reddish coat, this is a beautiful, special boy!  Fenced yard required.

If you are interested in finding out more about Lucky, please contact Northern Chesapeake Sheltie Rescue at 410-515-7029 
Or email them at [email protected]


Friday Funny–Sad Cat Diaries

An accurate compilation of the thoughts of sad cats everywhere:  

“Dear Diary,  My food dish is now only half full.  It is obvious I will now starve to death.  I have repeatedly tried to draw the attention of the authorities, but they are either stupid, deaf, or just cruel.  This may be my last entry…”

“The squirrel is back today…it is mocking me.   I will try to relieve myself from this torment by grooming myself…for 4 hours.”

Watch this video for more and have a great weekend, people! 

Take Your Dog to Work Day

Wednesdays around here are typically reserved for “Adoptables”.   But, when I realized that Take Your Dog to Work Day celebrated dogs AND adoption…well. 

Pet Sitters Internationalthe world’s largest educational association for professional pet sitters, (Barks and Blooms is a member) started Take Your Dog to Work Day in 2007 to celebrate dogs, to encourage adoption from humane societies, shelters, and rescue clubs.

This year, the 15th annual TYDTWD is Friday, June 21.  If your business is participating, let us know about it!

  PSI sponsors a photo contest that you can enter HERE.  
Check out last year’s winner!


This sweet rescue named Beverly and her owner won a $500 cash prize and $500 to her favorite shelter or rescue.  Woot!

Here’s the 2009 winner Holly, napping at the department of motor vehicles.  Can’t blame her; I get sleepy waiting for my number to come up, too.  

Enter your dog in the contest–and if you do–let us know!  It’s open until July 31, winners to be announced at the end of August.
te, but it has to be on a Wednesday–we’ve got you covered. Celebrate Take Your Pet To Work Week™ any day during June 17-21.

Do You Live in a Dog State or a Cat State?

Illustrated here is the difference between the percentage of households that own dogs and the percentage that own cats. Orange colors indicate a higher percentage of dog owners while blue colors indicate a higher percentage of cat owners.

In Maryland, it looks like we’re leaning more towards the Meows than the Woofs, which makes us in line with the top five cat-lovin’ states of Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Connecticut.  
The top dog states are Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, and Arizona.

So, which are you?  A Meow or a Woof?

Wednesday Adoptables–Well, Hello Dolly!!




Dolly is a 3 year old spayed yellow female. She is up to date on her shots and is heartworm positive; Lab Rescue will pay for her treatment. She is good with other dogs and is approved for kids aged 10 and up. She weighs 47 lbs but should be closer to 60. She knows some commands including sit and come and will benefit from additional training. She’s very friendly and loves to be around people. She can be a bit shy at first but warms up quickly. She likes to retrieve and play with toys.

For more information contact Lab-Rescue

E-mail us: [email protected]   |   Lab Line: (301) 299-6756